How Mandated Scheduling Would Impact this New York Small Business

Date: March 01, 2016 Last Edit: March 03, 2016

“Scheduling employees is an on-going task, we have a calendar that we fill out 3 weeks in advance.”

For the last four years, NFIB/New York member Rachel Reed and her husband have owned two small businesses, restaurants that provide jobs for eight employees. For her business, a mandated scheduling law enacted across the state would hamper her—and her workers—from doing what’s best for their business. “The restaurant industry cannot conform to the cookie-cutter approach that regards a half shift 4 hours,” she says.

In an interview, Reed talked about how mandated scheduling—which is currently being debated by New York State lawmakers in A8592 and S6263—would impact her small businesses and employees. At present, the bills would require employers in retail, food service or cleaning to adhere to strict schedules for employees.


How does scheduling employees play a role in your business? 
Scheduling employees is an on-going task, we have a calendar that we fill out 3 weeks in advance. Schedules are typically the same week-to-week with a little juggling depending on who needs time off or more hours.

How would this fair-scheduling proposal impact your small business? I am not in favor of the fair-scheduling proposal because it is another act that infringes the rights of the small business owner. I schedule fairly and mindfully, however I don’t always have a four-hour shift for employees. The restaurant industry cannot conform to the cookie-cutter approach that regards a half shift four hours.

What do you want lawmakers in NY to know about your business?  Most of my shifts are not eight hours: I would have tired, worn out, standing-around-wishing-they-could-leave waitresses if that were the case. I am a mom of four. I can respect the initiative certain groups are trying to achieve, especially for working moms, I am one. After being bludgeoned by the recent payroll hikes we are now facing having to guarantee hours we may not need employees on for.

Anything else you’d like to tell lawmakers? California Senator, Sharron Runner, understood the negative impact of this law when it was proposed in California when she said, “Every industry—from restaurants to retail—schedules employees based on their particular business model to ensure the ability to respond to both customer and employee needs. In fact, most retailers first obtain employee input to request time off or pick up additional hours of work. A schedule is then crafted to address employee requests, while also ensuring that customer demands are met.”

Related Content: Small Business News | New York

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